Thursday, January 05, 2006

James Aach: Rad Decision

Ian Hocking, author of Deja Vu, drew my attention to James Aach's online novel Rad Decision. You can go take a look for yourself.

James Aach is an engineer with a background in the nuclear-power industry, and Rad Decision is a thriller about a man who believes it is his destiny to destroy a nuclear-power plant. Well, this is a sound enough plot, and all will depend on how the author handles it. You can make your own judgement of that, because the novel has been posted at the rate of three episodes a week since last August.

The opening chapter looks promising to me, but the Rad Decision site provides no clue as to whether James Aach has already tried to get his novel published by a mainstream publisher, or has gone straight to the web. Either way, I don't think it does any harm to have the whole thing available for people to dip into if they wish.

2 comments:

SAND STORM said...

Michael,
You have mentioned posting chapters in a few of your posts and I being in a similar situation to James Aach wonder if it is the right way to go? Does it really promote us or benefit us to put a book on the net? Would publishers be interested if its already out there for free? Would it get us in the door any faster and would we be seen as something different than a author who persued the more traditional route? Has the time come where this new way of promoting a new writer will be seen as acceptable in the industry by both publisher and readers?
I still have not answered these questions to my satisfaction.
I would be interested in your thoughts. Steve

Ivan Prokopchuk said...

Hi Steve,
I think better form would be to put a chapter or two up in a web not your own. Out in Edmonton, I whetted Aaron Braaten's interest in my Light Over Newmarket and he set up a link with the comment "Light Over Newmarket is a pretty good read. You should try it." It's a little bit of finesse, since the link actually want back to my own site so the book could be read in its entirety, but it was a way. People began talking about it, including the noted Canadian critic Robet Fulford. Better read than dead?
I guess you could send me a chapter, but I am a tough market.
Writing too long to pore through Dick and Jane (Even though I loved that primer as a kid).